The Days of Our Weeks.

A play on words occurs to me.  What if Saturday was a derivative of Satyr’s Day?

The Satyrs roamed the woods and mountains of Greece as male companions of Dionysus & Pan.  Satyrs are often associated with sex-drive and were depicted with uncontrollable erections.  In the least, this speculation sounds like a reasonable basis for understanding the purpose of Saturday night.

Funny, right?!  Well then, what do the names of days mean & where do they come from?  I researched the answer (briefly).

Sunday = Day of the Sun: Hemera Heliou (Greek) – Dies Solis (Roman/latin) – Sunnandaeg (Germanic).

Monday = Day of the Moon: Selenes Hemera (Greek) – Lunae Dies (Roman/latin) – Monandaeg (Germanic).

Tuesday = Day of War: Areos Hemera (Greek) – Dies Martis (Roman/latin) – Tiwesdaeg (Germanic).

Wednesday = Day of Art / Poetry: Dies Mercurii (Roman/latin) – Wodnesdaeg (Germanic).

Thursday = Day of Storm / Reckoning: Dios Hemera (Greek) – Jovis Dies (Roman/latin) – Purresdaeg (Germanic).

Friday = Day of Love: Aphrodites Hemera (Greek) – Dies Veneris (Roman/latin) – Frigedaeg (Germanic).

Saturday = Day of Harvest / Reaping: Kronou Hemera (Greek) – Saturni Dies (Roman/latin) – Saeterdaeg (Germanic).

Here are the various gods associated with each day:

Sunday – the sun

Monday – the moon

Tuesday – Ares, Mars, Tiu (gods of war)

Wednesday – Mercury, Odin (gods associated with communication, wisdom, poetry)

Thursday – Zeus, Jupiter, Thor (gods of thunder)

Friday – Aphrodite, Venus, Frigga (Freya) (goddesses of love & fertility)

Saturday – Cronus, Saturn (titan/god associated with the harvest)

Everything follows the same pattern – Greek, Roman, then Germanic.  More importantly, there are no references to conventional religious figures.  Mind you, almost all mythology is astrological (astronomical) in source and orientation.

Sunday = The Sun

Monday = The Moon

Tuesday = Mars

Wednesday = Mercury

Thursday = Jupiter

Friday = Venus

Saturday = Saturn

These are the primary interstellar bodies which were visible to our two-thousand plus year old ancestors.  These are the big-movers in our historic skies, the masters of our ancient galaxy.  So powerful and influential, that all the world’s mythologies are rooted within them, the greatest personalities have been attributed to them and our future is (astrologically) bound with them.

These are the days of our weeks.

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One Response to The Days of Our Weeks.

  1. Schtonk says:

    Only your dead blog is a good blog.

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